Policy Institutes > Center for Policy Research
The Education Finance and Accountability Program at the Maxwell School, Syracuse University which was created in 2001, is part of the well-known, multi-disciplinary Center for Policy Research. The purpose of the Education Finance and Accountability Program, or EFAP, is to promote research, education, and debate about fundamental issues in the system of elementary and secondary education in the United States. It conducts "costing-out" and "Sound Basic Education"study for New York State, and also extensive comparision of school funding proposals by various organizations and government agencies. View Full Listing
Press Release
John Yinger. Center for Policy Research. 07/2005.
The column indicates that the key to determine the impact of aid programs on demand is to determine how they affect the income for and price of public education from the point of view of a local voter.
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John Yinger. Center for Policy Research. 06/2005.
The column evaluates the STAR program and finds that rental and sales-price provisions of the STAR result in an unfair distribution of tax relief, which is heavily skewed toward low-need and high-wealth districts. It also leads to increased spending and increased property tax rates in school districts throughout the state.
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John Yinger. Center for Policy Research. 05/2005.
The column introduces recent study on economy of size at school district level. The study finds substantial economies of size in both operating and capital spending. In addition, state aid policies in New York encourage extensive capital spending at the time of consolidation. As a result, consolidation leads to a boost in capital spending that offsets these enrollment-based cost savings by about 5 percentage points. Consolidation also results in small short-run adjustment costs in operating spending, but these costs phase out quickly over time.
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John Yinger. Center for Policy Research. 04/2005.
The column summarizes results from recent studies on various forms of whole school reform and indicates the findings provide a mixed support for such policy innovation.
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John Yinger. Center for Policy Research. 03/2005.
The columan finds that the central problem in high school education is not that the nation’s high schools are failing across the board, but is instead that high schools in poor, urban school districts have unacceptably low test scores and high drop-out rates.
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John Yinger. Center for Policy Research. 02/2005.
The column discusses the insufficiency of current accountability programs to improve student performance at school level, due to lack of knowledge on effectiveness of teaching and instruction of schools. It pledges state government to provide research support for schools to achieve performance goals.
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John Yinger. Center for Policy Research. 01/2005.
The column reports the estimated cost adjustment weight for disadvantaged students from empirical study and compares it to that from professional judgment method.
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John Yinger. Center for Policy Research. 12/2004.
This column reveals how much it would cost to bring all districts in the state up to an adequate education in New York State, based on recent study on student performance index.
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John Yinger. Center for Policy Research. 11/2004.
The column outlines the legal history of CEF vs. State of New York State case and highlights the implications of CFE decision on educational finance reform in the State.
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Court Expert Testimony
Reports and Presentations
William Duncombe. Center for Policy Research. 11/2005. p. 58.
Using data from rural school districts in New York, this paper provides the first direct estimation of consolidations cost impacts. We find economies of size in operating and capital spending: doubling enrollment cuts total costs per pupil by 28 percent for a 300-pupil district and by 9 percent for a 1,500-pupil district.
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Dana Balter (Education Finance and Accountability Program Center for Policy Research, Syracuse University) & William Duncombe (Education Finance and Accountability Program Center for Policy Research, Syracuse University). Center for Policy Research. 05/2005.
Despite the recent focus on teacher quality, relatively little research exists on district practices to recruit, screen and select teachers. This paper takes a first step in filling this gap by documenting the findings of a survey on teacher hiring practices in New York State school districts.
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Thomas S. Dee (Department of Economics, Swarthmore College) & Sarah R. Cohodes (Department of Economics, Swarthmore College). Center for Policy Research. 05/2005.
This study examines whether subject-specific teacher certification and academic degrees are related to teacher quality.
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Eric Isenberg (Department of Economics and Management, DePauw University). Center for Policy Research. 05/2005.
The author used data from the Schools and Staffing Survey to investigate the probability that school districts reward the master's degree in order to develop a large cadre of of internal candidates for administrative positions. The empirical evidence is weakly consistent with the theory.
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Jan Ondrich (Professor of Economics, Syracuse University), Emily Pas (Graduate assistant in Economics, Syracuse University) & John Yinger (Professor of Economics and Public Administration, Syracuse University). Center for Policy Research. 05/2005.
Policy makers and scholars have long been interested in the issue of teacher attrition, particularly in urban schools. We contribute to this literature by investigating the determinants of teacher attrition in New York State.
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Teresa Munzi (Luxembourg Income Study (LIS)), Timothy M. Smeeding (Center for Policy Research (CPR) Maxwell School of Syracuse University and the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS)) & Michael Eriksen (Center for Policy Research and Economics Syracuse University). Center for Policy Research. 05/2005.
The report investigates earnings gaps between elementary and secondary school teachers and similarly qualified men and women in a number of rich and middle income countries.
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Leanna Stiefel (Professor of Economics, Wagner Graduate School of Public Service New York University), Amy Ellen Schwartz (Professor of Public Policy, Education and Economics, Wagner Graduate School of Public Service New York University ) & Ingrid Gould Ellen (Associate Professor of Public Policy and Urban Planning, Wagner Graduate School of Public Service New York University). Center for Policy Research. 05/2005.
It is well-known that white and Asian students perform higher than black or Hispanic students on achievement tests. In this paper, we exploit longitudinal data on New York City’s elementary and middle schools and students to study these test score gaps.
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Charles Clotfelter (Sanford Institute of Public Policy, Duke University), Elizabeth Glennie (Sanford Institute of Public Policy, Duke University), Helen Ladd (Sanford Institute of Public Policy, Duke University) & Jacob Vigdor (Sanford Institute of Public Policy, Duke University). Center for Policy Research. 05/2005.
The study evaluates the impact of North Carolina’s program of giving yearly $1,800 bonuses to teachers of math, science and special education in middle and high schools serving low-income or low-performing students.
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Patrice Iatarola & Ross Rubenstein. Center for Policy Research. 03/2005. p. 30.
In 1996, the New York State Education Department began requiring all graduating high school students (starting with the Class of 1999) to pass rigorous end-of-course (Regents) exams in five subjects. This study explores whether the New York City Department of Education and New York City high schools have responded to these new standards by re-allocating resources, and whether the reallocation patterns systematically differ among high and low graduation rate schools.
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William Duncombe (Center for Policy Research, the Maxwell School, Syracuse University) & John Yinger (Center for Policy Research, the Maxwell School, Syracuse University). Center for Policy Research . 04/2004. p. 26.
This report intends to discuss the key issues that are involved in developing an operating aid formula to support a performance adequacy standard for New York State. The authors review some of the methods that are available for estimating the cost of an adequate education, and highlight design choices in developing an operating aid system. Following the narrative discussion of design choices are detailed comparisons of five different school reform proposals: Syracuse University proposal, Midstate School Finance Consortium proposal, the Regents Proposal on School Aid for 2004-05, the Campaign for Fiscal Equity “Adequacy Study”, and state aid proposal,6 and the Final Report of the Commission on Education Reform (Zarb Commission)
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