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Press Release
Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. 01/2006.
New York State School District Tax and Spending Proposals, 2005-06 School Year Over 2004-05
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David Schoenbrod. Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. 08/2005.
David Schoenbrod comments on CFE decision on March 2005.
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John Yinger. Center for Policy Research. 07/2005.
The column indicates that the key to determine the impact of aid programs on demand is to determine how they affect the income for and price of public education from the point of view of a local voter.
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Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. 06/2005.
Transcripts for a conference focusing on whether or not New York State legislature should take CFE decision in their budgeting consideration.
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John Yinger. Center for Policy Research. 06/2005.
The column evaluates the STAR program and finds that rental and sales-price provisions of the STAR result in an unfair distribution of tax relief, which is heavily skewed toward low-need and high-wealth districts. It also leads to increased spending and increased property tax rates in school districts throughout the state.
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Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. 05/2005.
Voter unhappiness with high school spending and property tax hikes in apparently remains stronger in Long Island than in other regions of New York State. Approval rates in Tuesday's budget voting were high in regions where schools seemed more sensitive to taxpayer concerns -- although that rarely meant tax levy increases of less than double the inflation rate.
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Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. 05/2005.
School districts across New York want to increase their spending at more than twice the rate of inflation, according to the Public Policy Institute's Annual School Tax Watch. And despite a record aid increase of nearly $900 million in the new state budget, proposed school property taxes would rise even faster.
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John Yinger. Center for Policy Research. 05/2005.
The column introduces recent study on economy of size at school district level. The study finds substantial economies of size in both operating and capital spending. In addition, state aid policies in New York encourage extensive capital spending at the time of consolidation. As a result, consolidation leads to a boost in capital spending that offsets these enrollment-based cost savings by about 5 percentage points. Consolidation also results in small short-run adjustment costs in operating spending, but these costs phase out quickly over time.
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John Yinger. Center for Policy Research. 04/2005.
The column summarizes results from recent studies on various forms of whole school reform and indicates the findings provide a mixed support for such policy innovation.
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Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. 03/2005.
In a wave of judicial decisions, state court judges in the US have decided that they have the power to tell legislatures to spend more on education. That is the result in 20 of the 29 cases decided so far and similar litigation is pending in almost every state. In the latest decision, Judge Leland DeGrasse signed an order on March 15 requiring New York State to increase massively its spending on New York City schools - by Dollars 5.6bn for operatiIn a wave of judicial decisions, state court judges in the US have decided that they have the power to tell legislatures to spend more on education. That is the result in 20 of the 29 cases decided so far and similar litigation is pending in almost every state. In the latest decision, Judge Leland DeGrasse signed an order on March 15 requiring New York State to increase massively its spending on New York City schools - by Dollars 5.6bn for operating expenses plus Dollars 9.2bn for improving facilities, to be phased in over the next five years.
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Court Expert Testimony
Jay P. Greene. Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. 1/8/2005.
The decision in the CFE lawsuit ordering more than $5 billion in additional spending on New York City Schools is likely to have little effect on student achievement in the city. Lack of money is not a primary explanation for the city’s low student performance, so having additional money by itself will do little to improve the situation.
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Reports and Presentations
William Duncombe. Center for Policy Research. 11/2005. p. 58.
Using data from rural school districts in New York, this paper provides the first direct estimation of consolidations cost impacts. We find economies of size in operating and capital spending: doubling enrollment cuts total costs per pupil by 28 percent for a 300-pupil district and by 9 percent for a 1,500-pupil district.
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Jay P. Greene, Marcus A. Winters & Greg Forster. Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. 08/2005.
This report shows that New York can reduce special ed costs and enrollment and improve parental satisfaction with the program as part of the bargain—by adopting two simple reforms: changing the formula funding special education from a bounty system to a “lump-sum” system; and implementing a voucher program for children in special education.
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Dana Balter (Education Finance and Accountability Program Center for Policy Research, Syracuse University) & William Duncombe (Education Finance and Accountability Program Center for Policy Research, Syracuse University). Center for Policy Research. 05/2005.
Despite the recent focus on teacher quality, relatively little research exists on district practices to recruit, screen and select teachers. This paper takes a first step in filling this gap by documenting the findings of a survey on teacher hiring practices in New York State school districts.
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Thomas S. Dee (Department of Economics, Swarthmore College) & Sarah R. Cohodes (Department of Economics, Swarthmore College). Center for Policy Research. 05/2005.
This study examines whether subject-specific teacher certification and academic degrees are related to teacher quality.
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Eric Isenberg (Department of Economics and Management, DePauw University). Center for Policy Research. 05/2005.
The author used data from the Schools and Staffing Survey to investigate the probability that school districts reward the master's degree in order to develop a large cadre of of internal candidates for administrative positions. The empirical evidence is weakly consistent with the theory.
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Don Boyd (University at Albany, SUNY), H. Landford (University at Albany, SUNY) & James Wyckoff (University at Albany, SUNY). Education Finance Research Consortium . 05/2005.
Using data on every teacher in New York State public elementary schools from 1994- 95 through 2001-2002, this paper examines the response of teachers to the implementation of state-mandated testing.
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Jan Ondrich (Professor of Economics, Syracuse University), Emily Pas (Graduate assistant in Economics, Syracuse University) & John Yinger (Professor of Economics and Public Administration, Syracuse University). Center for Policy Research. 05/2005.
Policy makers and scholars have long been interested in the issue of teacher attrition, particularly in urban schools. We contribute to this literature by investigating the determinants of teacher attrition in New York State.
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Teresa Munzi (Luxembourg Income Study (LIS)), Timothy M. Smeeding (Center for Policy Research (CPR) Maxwell School of Syracuse University and the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS)) & Michael Eriksen (Center for Policy Research and Economics Syracuse University). Center for Policy Research. 05/2005.
The report investigates earnings gaps between elementary and secondary school teachers and similarly qualified men and women in a number of rich and middle income countries.
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Leanna Stiefel (Professor of Economics, Wagner Graduate School of Public Service New York University), Amy Ellen Schwartz (Professor of Public Policy, Education and Economics, Wagner Graduate School of Public Service New York University ) & Ingrid Gould Ellen (Associate Professor of Public Policy and Urban Planning, Wagner Graduate School of Public Service New York University). Center for Policy Research. 05/2005.
It is well-known that white and Asian students perform higher than black or Hispanic students on achievement tests. In this paper, we exploit longitudinal data on New York City’s elementary and middle schools and students to study these test score gaps.
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Charles Clotfelter (Sanford Institute of Public Policy, Duke University), Elizabeth Glennie (Sanford Institute of Public Policy, Duke University), Helen Ladd (Sanford Institute of Public Policy, Duke University) & Jacob Vigdor (Sanford Institute of Public Policy, Duke University). Center for Policy Research. 05/2005.
The study evaluates the impact of North Carolina’s program of giving yearly $1,800 bonuses to teachers of math, science and special education in middle and high schools serving low-income or low-performing students.
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Advocacy and Publicity