Policy Institutes > Manhattan Institute for Policy Research
The Manhattan Institute for Policy Research is an influential New York City-based free market think tank established in 1978. Their self-described mission is to "develop and disseminate new ideas that foster greater economic choice and individual responsibility." The Institute supports and publicizes research on taxes, welfare, crime, the legal system, urban life, race, education and immigration among others.Their message is communicated through books, articles, interviews, speeches, op-edís and through the institute's quarterly publication City Journal, targeted at policymakers, politicians, scholars and journalists.View Full Listing
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Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. 01/2006.
New York State School District Tax and Spending Proposals, 2005-06 School Year Over 2004-05
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David Schoenbrod. Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. 08/2005.
David Schoenbrod comments on CFE decision on March 2005.
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Jay P. Greene, Marcus A. Winters & Greg Forster. Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. 08/2005.
This report shows that New York can reduce special ed costs and enrollment and improve parental satisfaction with the program as part of the bargain—by adopting two simple reforms: changing the formula funding special education from a bounty system to a “lump-sum” system; and implementing a voucher program for children in special education.
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Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. 06/2005.
Transcripts for a conference focusing on whether or not New York State legislature should take CFE decision in their budgeting consideration.
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Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. 05/2005.
Voter unhappiness with high school spending and property tax hikes in apparently remains stronger in Long Island than in other regions of New York State. Approval rates in Tuesday's budget voting were high in regions where schools seemed more sensitive to taxpayer concerns -- although that rarely meant tax levy increases of less than double the inflation rate.
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Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. 05/2005.
School districts across New York want to increase their spending at more than twice the rate of inflation, according to the Public Policy Institute's Annual School Tax Watch. And despite a record aid increase of nearly $900 million in the new state budget, proposed school property taxes would rise even faster.
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Jay P. Greene (Senior Fellow, Manhattan Institute for Policy Research) & Marcus A. Winters (Research Associate, Manhattan Institute for Policy Research). Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. 04/2005.
This study evaluates the effect that the size of a state's school districts has on public high school graduation rates.
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Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. 03/2005.
In a wave of judicial decisions, state court judges in the US have decided that they have the power to tell legislatures to spend more on education. That is the result in 20 of the 29 cases decided so far and similar litigation is pending in almost every state. In the latest decision, Judge Leland DeGrasse signed an order on March 15 requiring New York State to increase massively its spending on New York City schools - by Dollars 5.6bn for operatiIn a wave of judicial decisions, state court judges in the US have decided that they have the power to tell legislatures to spend more on education. That is the result in 20 of the 29 cases decided so far and similar litigation is pending in almost every state. In the latest decision, Judge Leland DeGrasse signed an order on March 15 requiring New York State to increase massively its spending on New York City schools - by Dollars 5.6bn for operating expenses plus Dollars 9.2bn for improving facilities, to be phased in over the next five years.
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Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. 03/2005.
The Campaign for Fiscal Equity decision ordering more than $5 billion a year in additional spending on New York City schools is likely to have little effect on student achievement in the city. Because lack of money is not a primary explanation for the cityís low student performance, additional money by itself will do little to improve the situation.
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Jay P. Greene. Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. 02/2005.
THE courts may order more than $5 billion a year in added spending on New York City schools ó without actually boosting student achievement.
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