Published Papers & Books
Show items around this date:
Key Reports
1-10 of 139 items | Page 1 of 14<< Back | Next >>
Page: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10 
NYSSFA Teachers College . 08/2006.
 View Full-Text
NYSSFA Teachers College . 08/2006.
 View Full-Text
Heather G. Peske & Kati Haycock. Education Trust. 06/2006.
This report found large differences between the qualifications of teachers in the highest-poverty and highest-minority schools and teachers serving in schools with few minority and low-income students.
 View PDF
Heather G. Peske & Kati Haycock. Education Trust.. 06/2006.
The report found that one in five teachers in New York's high-poverty secondary schools (grades 9-12) is not trained in the core academic subjects they are teaching. In contrast, in New York's wealthier schools, just three percent of teachers are not teaching in their subjects of expertise.
 View PDF
Thomas B. Fordham Institute. 06/2006.
This proposal’s signatories call on policymakers to transform the school funding system in service of meeting our high ambitions for student learning.
 View PDF
Daria Hall & Shana Kennedy. Education Trust. 03/2006. p. 24.
The report examines state assessment results in reading and math between 2003 and 2005 and finds that progress in raising achievement and closing gaps continues to be strongest in the elementary grades. Overall achievement in middle and high school has improved somewhat.
 View PDF View Abstract
New York State Council of School Superintendents . 01/2006.
The brief comments on Governor's proposed budget for school aid in year 2006-2007
 View PDF
Bob Cohen (Public Policy and Education Fund, Inc.). Public Policy and Education Fund, Inc.. 12/2005. p. 38.
This report is the fourth in a series of reports that analyze the impact of state policy decisions on school districts and school children across the State of New York.
 View PDF
Education Trust. 12/2005. p. 11.
The report looks at the outcomes of policy choices made in every state and documents that most states continue to shortchange the districts educating the greatest numbers of poor students and students of color.
 View PDF
1-10 of 139 items | Page 1 of 14<< Back | Next >>
Page: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10 
Book Reviews
1-2 of 2 items | Page 1 of 1<< Back | Next >>
Page: 1 
Timothy Hasci. New York Times Review of Books. 01/2004.
Final Test: The Battle for Adequacy in America's Schools by Peter Schrag.
 View Full-Text
Margaret L. Plecki. Journal of Education Finance. 06/2000.
This book focuses on key aspects of revenue generation for the support of public schools. The first section of the book provides general information about revenue sources, trends, and frameworks for evaluating various taxation-based strategies for raising revenues for schools.
 View PDF View Abstract
1-2 of 2 items | Page 1 of 1<< Back | Next >>
Page: 1 
Book Chapters
1-3 of 3 items | Page 1 of 1<< Back | Next >>
Page: 1 
Don Boyd, Hamp Lankford, Susanna Loeb & James Wyckoff. Teacher Policy Research . 05/2005.
The paper discussed the role of teacher in student learning and reviewed various strategies to improve the quality of teacher workforce.
 View PDF View Abstract
Michael A. Rebell (Executive Director and Counsel for the Campaign for Fiscal Equity, Inc. ). Campaign for Fiscal Equity, Inc.. 01/2004.
The author reviews the history of education finance litigation, focusing on the adequacy lawsuits of the last 15 years.
 View PDF View Abstract Hyperlink
John Yinger (Center for Policy Research at the Maxwell School, Syracuse University). Helping Children Left Behind: State Aid and the Pursuit of Educational Equity. 01/2004.
An overview of the research on state aid to education and a detailed look at state aid reform in five key states: Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Texas, and Vermont.
 View PDF View Abstract
1-3 of 3 items | Page 1 of 1<< Back | Next >>
Page: 1 
   
Key Journal Articles
11-20 of 20 items | Page 2 of 2<< Back | Next >>
Page: 1  2 
Tom Perrotta . New York Law Journal. 10/2001.
Nearly 10 months after a judge found that New York City children were being denied their constitutional right to a "sound education," the Appellate Division, First Department, yesterday heard arguments over the State's role in education and whether the trial court overstepped its bounds. Presiding Justice Joseph Sullivan and Justices Peter Tom, David B. Saxe, Alfred D. Lerner and John T. Buckley heard the arguments in the appeal
 View Full-Text
Susanna Loeb & Hamp Lankford. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis. 03/2001. Vol. 24. Iss. 1. p. 37-62.
This paper uses rich new data on New York State teachers to: determine how much variation in the average attributes of teachers exists across schools, identif, schools that have the least-qualified teachers, assess whether the distribution has changed over time, and determine how the distribution of teachers is impacted by attrition and transfer, as well as by the job matches between teachers and schools at the start of careers. Our results show striking differences in the qualifications of teachers across schools.
 View PDF View Abstract
John Caher. New York Law Journal. 01/2001.
Yesterday, in a press conference following his formal budget presentation, Governor Pataki said that while he agrees New York's system for funding education is inadequate, he neither appreciates nor considers appropriate the interference of the judiciary. He said for the first time yesterday that Justice DeGrasse's opinion will be appealed, in part to ensure that the power of the Legislature is not usurped by the courts. "It is not the role of a judge to run the education system," Governor Pataki said. "It is the role of the people in authority - local officials, school officials, educational officials and the state and legislative officials. We intend to do that."
 View Full-Text
Victoria Rivkin. New York Law Journal. 01/2001.
After seven months of trial, 72 witnesses and more than 4,300 documents, Campaign for Fiscal Equity (CFE), a coalition of parents, students and educators, won a ruling that New York City's public school children are not getting a "sound basic education" as required by the New York State Constitution. But in prescribing a remedy, Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Leland DeGrasse deferred to the State Legislature to create and implement reform by Sept. 15, 2001. He ordered the parties to appear before him on June 15 to report on their progress
 View Full-Text
John Caher. New York Law Journal. 01/2001.
Exactly one week after Governor Pataki proposed fundamental changes in the way New York funds education, a Manhattan Supreme Court ruling yesterday in a school funding case may force the Legislature to deal with a gnarly issue a lot sooner than planned. Observers at the Capitol yesterday suggested that Justice Leland DeGrasse's ruling that New York's funding systems fails to provide New York City school students with the sound education required by law will immediately move a long-lingering issue to the forefront of this legislative session.
 View Full-Text
Thomas Sobol (Christian A. Johnson Prof. of Outstanding Educational Practice, Teachers College, Columbia University). Teachers College Record. 10/2000. p. 10.
In this interview, Sobel outlines the basic concept of equal educational opportunity and its fiscal implications.
 View PDF View Abstract
Thomas Sobol. Teachers College Record. 10/2000. p. 7.
In this interview, Sobel presents evidence that money does matters in improving educational equity and adequacy.
 View PDF View Abstract
Thomas Sobol. Teachers College Record. 10/2000. p. 5.
In the interview, Sobel outlines the remedies for current inequity in educational finance.
 View PDF View Abstract
Eric A. Hanushek (Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution , Stanford University). Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis. 06/1997. Vol. 19. Iss. 2. p. 25.
The close to 400 studies of student achievement demonstrate that there is not a strong or consistent relationship between student performance and school resources, at least after variations in family inputs are taken into account.
 View PDF View Abstract
Thomas Sobol. Teachers College Record. 01/1997. p. 5.
This article argues that new high standards are necessary and desirable, but that alone they are not enough. Throughout our history the schools have sought to make students wise and just, as well as competent.
 View PDF View Abstract
11-20 of 20 items | Page 2 of 2<< Back | Next >>
Page: 1  2