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Journal News. 5/6/2006.
Yonkers declared victory this week in its battle for more state school aid by withdrawing a lawsuit filed 11 months ago to secure more funding. City government and the Board of Education are apparently willing to take the state at its word that millions of dollars in additional funding granted this year will be recurring in future years. That's a leap of faith considering that city schools were bruised in earlier years when additional aid was not forthcoming. That's what brought on the lawsuit.
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Journal News. 4/20/2006.
The easiest thing that New York's highest court could do about the state's oh-so-longstanding school-funding equity case would be to wait out the departure of the oh-so-long-avoidant governor.
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Journal News. Journal News. 4/16/2006.
Last week's chest-thumping contest over the state budget between the governor and state legislative leaders aside, local school officials and taxpayers at least can be grateful for one thing: State education aid figures for the 2006-'07 school year that are contained in the Legislature's budget apparently can be counted on. That means voters can go to the polls next month to decide the fate of local school budgets a bit more confident than usual that they won't be blindsided by broken, even unmade, promises.
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Journal News. 3/31/2006.
Yonkers' financial future looks brighter this week than any time since the last state Emergency Financial Control Board packed up and left town in 1998. Credit an attitude change in city-state relations, election-year politics, state realization that high-needs school districts such as Yonkers require increased funding, and the city's own willingness to contribute to that funding for the proposed $84.7 million state-aid package that will greatly ease the district's $100 million budget shortfall.
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Journal News. 3/2/2006.
In everyday speech, people often confuse the words "hilarious'' with "hysterical'' simply put, the first means very funny; the second, wildly out of control. The words coming out of the mouth of the state Senate majority leader over state funding of New York City schools were both.
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Journal News. 1/8/2006.
It's too bad that George Pataki's public-education legacy will forever be overshadowed not only by his inability to reform school funding in New York, but, in fact, by his stubborn strategy of dragging out the court-ordered settlement of a longstanding lawsuit that would help do just that.
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Journal News. 4/1/2005.
"It's an on-time budget, but it's certainly not a final budget. There is a lot of work still to do . . ." There is truth in Gov. George Pataki's somewhat wet-blanket response yesterday as the Legislature met the state budget deadline for the first time in 21 years. The Legislature and governor were content to perpetuate another failure in discussing a budget that did not adequately respond to a court order that it bring New York City school funding to constitutionally required levels.
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Journal News. 3/29/2005.
Legislators, as is their habit, have sidestepped what to do about court-ordered billions of new dollars for New York City schools. They did add $314 million to Pataki's overall school-aid proposal, with high-need schools, including many in New York City, targeted for the lion's share. Apparently, though, since Republican Pataki has appealed the school case, brought by the Campaign for Fiscal Equity, lawmakers have reasoned that they, too, can afford to ignore that niggling detail.
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Journal News. 2/9/2004.
The courts had already provided an answer to one question: Does New York state apply adequate, equitable funding to ensure that all students have an opportunity to receive the level of public education required by the state constitution?
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Journal News. 3/23/2003.
Those who have ever wanted to share their views on how schools are funded in New York state - and by how much - have an unprecedented opportunity to do so. The unique chance to actually change the convoluted, highly political system that has burdened taxpayers and hamstrung elected officials and policy-makers for generations must be taken advantage of.
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Yancey Roy. Journal News. 5/3/2006.
Democrat Tom Suozzi announced a plan yesterday that he said would cut property taxes by $2.15 billion, primarily downstate, in exchange for capping school spending.
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David McKay Wilson. Journal News. 5/2/2006.
With a massive infusion of state aid in hand, a citizens group suing New York over inadequate education funding for Yonkers today will ask Supreme Court Justice Joan Lefkowitz to dismiss its lawsuit against the state.
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Michael Gannon. Journal News. 3/30/2006.
The state Legislature is adding $84.7 million in new aid for Yonkers in the budget it expects to pass this week, more than half of which will be new, recurring revenue to help the city address the annual budget crises that have crippled its schools.
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Michael Gannon. Journal News. 3/29/2006.
A new poll conducted by an education advocacy group has found that more than half of voters in three closely contested state Senate districts, including one in Yonkers, are "very concerned" that the Senate has not increased funding for poor school systems.
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David McKay Wilson. Journal News. 3/26/2006.
Westchester's six cities would receive major increases in state aid under an agreement hammered out by state legislators, with Yonkers receiving a 25.4 percent increase valued at $20.7 million.
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David McKay Wilson. Journal News. 8/27/2005.
Unequal funding among school districts is not a cause for legal action, the New York Attorney General has argued in response to a lawsuit from the Yonkers Board of Education. The state has asked Supreme Court Justice Joan Lefkowitz to dismiss major claims in the Yonkers school board's lawsuit challenging the state's system for parceling out financial aid for education to local districts.
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Poughkeepsie Journal. 7/28/2005.
New York is facing a court order to provide more funding to New York City schools, and state leaders still haven't settled long-standing differences about how to resolve the matter. Ideas to streamline the state's confusing school-aid formula have gotten nowhere. Neither have proposals to add a reasonable amount of funding to the most needy districts over time while holding harmless the state's wealthier school districts. In the long run, taxpayers would be better served by a remedy offered by their elected officials rather than one imposed by the courts
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Mid Hudson News. 6/18/2005.
As the State Legislature is winding down it session readying to adjourn this coming week, Senator William Larkin yesterday briefed members of the New Paltz Regional Chamber of Commerce about some of the key issues addressed this year.
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David McKay Wilson. Journal News. 6/10/2005.
The lawyer who won a court order for $5.6 billion in new school funding for New York City said last night that Yonkers was using "an ineffective strategy" in its suit against the state. Attorney Michael Rebell said he didn't agree with one of the major arguments in Yonkers' case that Yonkers should receive education aid comparable to that of Buffalo, Syracuse and Rochester because the upstate communities were much poorer than Yonkers.
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David McKay Wilson. Journal News. 6/3/2005.
During the past two years, as the Yonkers school board eliminated nearly 500 jobs, including 8 percent of its teaching staff, schools officials assured restive parents that all was well test scores were rising, and the reduced staff was meeting the needs of 27,000 students in the state's fourth-largest district. On Wednesday, the school board presented a different view, declaring in a lawsuit challenging New York's school-aid distribution system, that all, in fact, was not well. Classes are overcrowded, and students "are failing standardized tests at alarming rates."
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