Journalism > Finger Lakes
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Jody Siegle. Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. 9/6/2005.
As students head back to school preoccupied with their friends, teachers and classes, they are probably oblivious to the huge debate over how best to educate them. A glance at the education headlines provides a list of the issues that school board members will be discussing this year.
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Ithaca Journal. 3/29/2005.
As the state faces another budget shortfall and the $5 billion settlement to the Campaign For Fiscal Equity suit looms over state education dollars, the prospect of bountiful state aid in the foreseeable future is a fantasy at best. Rather than wringing their hands and reciting sob stories to the school board, members of the Ithaca Public Education Initiative -- funded by generous individuals and businesses such as the Trust Company -- took matters into their own hands and created a new, hopefully ongoing, revenue stream to ensure educational extras.
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The Post-Standard. 2/16/2005.
Twelve years ago, the Campaign for Fiscal Equity began its fight for adequate funding for New York City schools. In that span, an entire generation of children has moved through the public school system without benefiting from their state's constitutional guarantee of a "sound, basic education."
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Bob Rolfe (Retired editor of the Corning Leader). Corning Leader. 2/14/2005.
If anybody in this area is versed in the legal implications of education in New York state, it's Tom O'Brien. Like him or not, he's proved his expertise many times. That's why The Insider was fascinated to read Tom's recent comments to the Corning Rotary Club regarding the court decision to force an enormous increase in the amount of money the state funnels into New York City schools.
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The Post-Standard. 1/19/2005.
On Tuesday, Pataki proposed a budget with a 3.4 percent increase in education spending, which would mean $526million more statewide for the 2005-06 school year. More than 61 percent of the statewide increase, or $325million, would be set aside in a "Sound Basic Education Aid" fund for school districts with high needs, including New York City. The money would come from new video lottery terminals, the governor said.
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The Post-Standard. 1/13/2005.
On Tuesday, the New York Civil Liberties Union appealed to the state's highest court to allow a lawsuit against the state. Two lower courts previously ruled that the NYCLU had insufficient grounds to sue. What was the subject of the lawsuit? A violation of someone's freedom of speech or expression - issues usually associated with civil liberties groups and their court cases? No, the NYCLU wants to pursue a lawsuit on behalf of Syracuse and 11 other school districts outside New York City
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The Post-Standard. 12/20/2004.
A take-at-home test: 1) The Syracuse City School District and other underfunded school districts are closely watching to see how the state responds to a court-appointed panel that has recommended $5.6 billion more in state aid for New York City schools. That money would satisfy a lawsuit brought by the Campaign for Fiscal Equity, which successfully argued that New York City schools were failing to provide a basic education to their students...Should Syracuse and other districts...
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The Post-Standard. 8/11/2004.
On Monday the district learned it would receive $30 million in additional state aid to nearly close its massive, $33 million budget deficit. Unfortunately, this year's school aid resolution was a demonstration of two often-used adages: putting a Band-Aid on a gaping wound and robbing Peter to pay Paul.
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James Macallair (Retired social studies teacher from Nottingham High School in Syracuse; a local representative with the Alliance for Quality Education. ). The Post-Standard. 7/22/2004.
Rather than budget extensions, parents, educators and Syracuse residents need to lobby for a budget that includes a school aid plan. Gov. Pataki and Senate Majority Leader Bruno each blamed Assembly Speaker Silver for the failure to reach an agreement over school aid at the end of the regular legislative session last month. But it is Speaker Silver who tried to comply with the court decision for the Campaign for Fiscal Equity. Pataki and Bruno are the ones shirking their responsibility and breaking the law.
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Patty Malgieri (Patty Malgieri of Rochester is president and CEO of the Center for Governmental Research, a nonpartisan policy analysis arm of the Gleason Center for State Policy, based in Rochester and Albany. ). The Post-Standard. 7/13/2004.
To make real progress in education, we need a more reasonable debate focused on three key questions: How is state school aid being allocated? How does school aid translate into classroom performance? How can the state help improve performance and ensure accountability?
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David McKay Wilson. Journal News. 1/16/2006.
Though its school board is no longer a party to a lawsuit challenging New York's school-aid system, Yonkers school officials say the district will continue to fund a nonprofit group's legal efforts because a court victory could bring millions from Albany.
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Erika Rosenberg. Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. 4/4/2005.
New York has a court decision ordering it to change the way it funds local schools, but that didn't stop lawmakers from divvying up this year's money pretty much the way they always have. In the budget adopted Thursday by the Legislature, nearly every district got more money than last fiscal year and the regional distribution remained the same: 38 percent of the $848 million increase goes to New York City, 12 percent to Long Island and 50 percent to the rest of the state. It stayed the same because Senate Republicans fought to maintain the traditional split.
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Heather Hare. Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. 3/30/2005.
A loss for charter schools in Rochester is a gain for the City School District. With two charter schools scheduled to close in June because of poor academic performance, more than 1,000 students are expected to return to district schools and with them will come about $16.5 million in aid.
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Erika Rosenberg. Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. 3/17/2005.
Last year it held up agreement on the entire $100 billion state budget for more than four months. But this year there has been virtually no mention of a landmark ruling that said New York City schools and possibly those in other districts should get billions more in state aid. This year there is more public pressure to avoid a budget stalemate and the school lawsuit is back in the courts
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Enid Arbelo . Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. 3/10/2005.
School districts could see a significant increase in state aid if a proposal that plays off a recent court order is adopted, an education advocate [Michael Rebell] said on Wednesday in Rochester
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Heather Hare. Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. 2/16/2005.
A group of parents and educators across the state called on Gov. George Pataki on Tuesday to stop stalling and fix the school funding system. "To keep dragging this on further is only hurting our children and hurting their chances of getting a good education," said Darryl Porter, president of the Rochester school board.
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Fred A. Mohr. The Post-Standard. 2/16/2005.
Steep increases in mandated costs and a reduction in state aid have helped create a $2.5 million budget gap that makes staff cuts inevitable next year, Hannibal Schools Superintendent Michael DiFabio said this week.
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Heather Hare & Enid Arbelo . Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. 1/19/2005.
Gov. George Pataki's budget is a good start but not a solution to the state's school funding problems, area educators said. "The governor at least now recognizes that there is a problem," said Maria Behncke, local coordinator for the Alliance for Quality Education, an advocacy group. "But he's not really addressing the problem."
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Heather Hare. Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. 12/19/2004.
A heated exchange between City School District officials and the dean of the state legislative delegation could signal continuing difficulties for the district as the 2005 budget season approaches. During a meeting Wednesday at which 16 Rochester high school students were onlookers, Assemblyman David Gantt took issue with the district's plan for spending at least $8 million of a $20 million state loan before an audit of district finances is completed next month
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Mark Hare. Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. 12/7/2004.
Court-appointed referees have concluded that it will take $5.6 billion more in annual operating aid and $9.2 billion for facilities improvements to provide New York City children with the "sound basic education" guaranteed by the state constitution. The fate of New York City's aid package is now in the hands of the Manhattan justice who appointed the referees to come up with a solution only after the Legislature and Gov. George Pataki squandered more than a year failing to devise a formula that would guarantee adequate funding for all schools in the state.
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Columns
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Judy Ducayne. The Citizen. 3/1/2005.
New York state taxpayers are being strong-armed by the education system once again. The newest "scam" says we need to produce more money to fund New York City schools. This would result in major income tax increases for middle-class families or a huge statewide sales tax increase. We're talking about a total increase in school spending amounting to $9.36 billion, according to the Campaign for Fiscal Equity. This would be put in place over the next four years in equal amounts of about $2.46 billion per year.
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Letters to the Editor
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Vito Sciscioli (Sirector, Syracus 20/20). The Post-Standard. 1/24/2005.
On behalf of Syracuse 20/20, I am writing relative to your Dec. 20 editorial, "Court Gesture" and other articles recently reporting on school finance reform in New York State. Syracuse 20/20 certainly agrees that the citizens of this state face an historic opportunity to demand statewide reform of New York's education funding system that provides all students with a sound basic education. However, we would argue that the solution must be through state legislation enacted during the 2005 Legislative Session and not through the courts.
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Richard Lindsay. The Post-Standard. 8/10/2004.
Your July 30 editorial, "Another Failure," was a deliberately disingenuous presentation of our education financial situation. The editor seems to ignore the real goal here, which is providing all children in New York state with a sound education, without bankrupting the state's taxpayers in order to do so.
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Calvin Corriders (President, Syracuse Board of Education) & Cynthia Kirby (Vice President, Syracuse Board of Education). The Post-Standard. 5/3/2004.
The Syracuse City School District educates a student population that contains many more students of poverty, students with disabilities and students with limited English proficiency than the surrounding districts. All of these students require more resources in order to succeed. In addition, our infrastructure is very old, most of the buildings being between 70 and 100 years old. This requires more resources to upgrade and maintain our school buildings.
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Samira Ahmned (Deputy Director, Campaign for Fiscal Equity). The Post-Standard. 8/24/2001.
Your editorial Aug. 17 called on the state to ensure that all children, regardless of social or economic class, receive a sound basic education. We could not agree more. The threshold task is to ascertain the cost of providing a sound, basic education. The Campaign for Fiscal Equity calls on the Legislature to appoint an independent panel to begin this important
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