Journalism > Long Island
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Michael Gormley. Newsday. 5/1/2005.
An appeals court is scheduled to make two rulings Tuesday that could force the state to come up with billions of dollars more in school aid for September and blow apart New York's first on-time budget in 20 years. CFE seeks to eliminate the temporary stay or delay of the court order to pay billions of dollars more in state school aid to New York City schools until the appeal is decided. The parent and teachers union group also seeks to force the appeal to be decided quicker, by the end of June instead of a year or more from now as would normally be the case.
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Newsday. 4/18/2005.
The depth of Hempstead's difficulties and the lack of talent and cohesion among school officials suggests that the district's actions may not be enough to ensure a quality education and safe environment for its students. Leadership isn't the only deficit. State school aid and local tax policies have deprived the district of its fair share of funds, placing a burden on officials and homeowners alike.
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Gary Bixhorn (Superintendent of Eastern Suffolk BOCES.). Newsday. 4/14/2005.
On Long Island, there is a tremendous disparity among school districts. We have many of the finest school systems in the state and some that are furthest from meeting state standards. The gap between these two sets of school districts was recently reinforced through the release of two documents - a reprint of the Newsday editorial series "The Shame of the Suburbs" and the Long Island Education Coalition-Long Island Association report, "Long Island Education: Costs and Outcomes and Regional Priorities for State Aid Reform."
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William Bernhard (Superintendent, Babylon Village Schools; Adjunct Professor, School Finance and School Business Administration at Stony Brook University). Massapequa Post. 4/1/2005.
In our efforts to pass budgets, we have everything working against us. State aid formulas that are blatantly unfair, a discriminatory property tax system, a state legislature that for 20 years in a row has failed to adopt a budget on time while legislatively imposing budget deadlines on local school districts, and a pattern of recent legislation by the same legislature, under the guise of disclosure, that is subtlety designed to defeat school budgets. Everyone including the courts agree that the funding formulas for state aid are broken!
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Newsday. 3/11/2005.
Real estate developer and philanthropist Roger Tilles deserved all the fine words state lawmakers lavished on him Tuesday before the legislature approved his appointment to New York's top educational policy board. Tilles must speak first for Nassau and Suffolk, his official role on the Board of Regents. But he also has a responsibility statewide. If there is an apparent conflict between his regional and statewide roles, as could be the case in settling New York City's successful claim that it was shortchanged on school aid, then he should choose the side of the greater good.
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Maureen O'Connell (Assemblywoman, New York State Assembly). Garden City Life. 2/25/2005.
We are writing to applaud the recent decision by Governor Pataki to appeal the recent Campaign for Fiscal Equity decision of State Supreme Court Justice Leland DeGrasse. This appeal will put the brakes on Long Island taxpayers footing the bill for the failures of city schools.
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Jennifer Wheary (Senior fellow at Demos, a public policy organization in Manhattan.). Newsday. 2/22/2005.
Failing city schools require dramatic action and urgent attention. While city and state officials negotiate and debate who's responsible for providing additional funding, an essential point goes ignored. The issue of under-funded, underachieving city schools is much more than a city or state debate. It is a national concern.
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Maureen O'Connell (Assemblywoman, New York State Assembly). 1/28/2005.
I look forward to a New Year and a new chance at working together with my conference, the entire Assembly and Senate, and the governor to pass legislation that will benefit everyone and enrich the lives of all New Yorkers. We will focus on education by working to create an equitable school aid formula, restore comprehensive operating aid to school districts and provide mandate relief.
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Port Times Record. 1/6/2005.
Here are just a few predictions for what the year ahead may have in store good, bad and ugly. For a fun, low-cost game, hold onto this list and see if we're right!
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Port Times Record . 6/30/2004.
The State of New York has gone yet another fiscal year without a budget being passed on time, and now lawmakers believe it is okay to leave the legislature for summer break with still no budget. The school districts and the taxpayers who support them have been seriously inconvenienced by the state's lack of action on this matter as the districts have had to create school budgets with only an estimate of the state aid that is expected. And when the state does not come through with the dollars needed, it is the local taxpayers who are left to pick up the slack through hefty property taxes.
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Newsday. 6/1/2005.
The Yonkers Board of Education claimed in court papers Wednesday that the state has been underfunding the city's schools by tens of millions of dollars every year. In a lawsuit filed in state Supreme Court in White Plains, the board and a coalition of parents' groups charged that state aid is inadequate and is unequal compared to aid for Syracuse, Buffalo and Rochester. A successful lawsuit could help Yonkers avoid its yearly battle to close the school budget and the layoffs and cutbacks that often accompany it.
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Bryan Virasami. Newsday. 5/8/2005.
All they want for Mother's Day, two council members said Sunday, are smaller class sizes and a tax surcharge on the wealthy to help pay for it. Annabel Palma of the Bronx and Sara Gonzalez of Brooklyn, both Democrats, called on Mayor Michael Bloomberg to support a push to extend a tax surcharge on some 25,000 New Yorkers. The surcharge on those making $500,000 or more a year would add up to about $380 million a year and would be used specifically to fund smaller class sizes in public school classrooms.
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Wil Cruz. Newsday. 5/4/2005.
A state Appellate Division panel yesterday refused to overturn a stay in Gov. George Pataki's appeal of a court order giving city schools billions of dollars in additional funding.
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Newsday. 5/3/2005.
The state Appellate Division on Tuesday upheld Gov. George Pataki's stay of a multibillion dollar education funding lawsuit while it's appealed, but agreed to speed the case along by more than seven months. The mixed decision by the mid-level appeals panel means the lawsuit won by the Campaign for Fiscal Equity won't blow apart the 2005-06 state budget adopted March 31. CFE Executive Director Michael Rebell said any court-ordered payment by the state will likely now be part of the 2006-07 state budget.
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Wil Cruz. Newsday. 4/20/2005.
The Campaign for Fiscal Equity will file a court motion today against the state in hopes of forcing it to hand over billions of additional dollars to the city in the upcoming school year for education. A State Supreme Court judge last month said that an additional $5.6 billion in operating costs and $9.2 billion in facilities annually would have to be phased in over several years to ensure that city children receive a "sound, basic education."
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David Jones & Arthur Levine. Newsday. 4/19/2005.
Think back to your years in school. If you were fortunate, there was a teacher who made you excited about what you were learning, who gave you the sense - perhaps for the first time - that you could do more than you thought, who may even have inspired you to choose a particular calling. Far too many schoolchildren in New York City have never been exposed to such a teacher. That is why the report issued last week by the Commission on CFE [Campaign for Fiscal Equity] Implementation - an independent body created by the City Council to recommend how to spend billions of additional dollars in court-ordered school funding - is animated by one central idea: School reform in the city cannot succeed until each and every child has an excellent teacher. Not a competent or even a very good teacher, but an excellent teacher
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Now Kerrey won't run - probably
Glenn Thrush & Bryan Virasami. Newsday. 4/19/2005.
Glenn Thrush with Dan Janison & Bryan Virasami. Newsday. 4/18/2005.
New School University President Bob Kerrey's mayoral aspirations seem to have come and gone like the 48-hour flu. But he may get the bug again. The former Nebraska senator now says he's a long shot to challenge Mayor Michael Bloomberg after telling reporters this weekend that he just might be "crazy enough" to run. "It is highly unlikely, although I haven't made a final decision," Kerrey said yesterday. When asked if he'd consider a City Hall bid in the future, Kerrey said "It's more likely than not. ... I love politics, I love public life."
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Bryan Virasami, with Wil Cruz and Dan Janison. Newsday. 4/15/2005.
Affluent New Yorkers should do more to finance public schools and the city should get more cops on the streets, City Council Speaker Gifford Miller proposed yesterday in his formal response to the mayor's budget plan. Miller focused largely on education, taxes and $276 million worth of restorations in budget cuts proposed in Michael Bloomberg's 2006 plan. Miller, who is seeking the Democratic nod for mayor and will be forced from office by term limits in December, made his last budget response as speaker during a Red Room presentation at City Hall yesterday. His top proposal is the personal tax surcharge, he said, which would collect $400 million from an estimated 25,000 New Yorkers who earn $500,000 or more per year. The funds would be dedicated to education programs - such as making classes smaller - an issue he's touted in campaign speeches.
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Joseph Kellard. Oceanside-Island Park Herald. 4/14/2005.
The New York state Legislature's first on-time budget since 1984 will provide some additional funding for the Oceanside and Island Park school districts, but according to the districts' superintendents, state aid needs to be more substantial
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Joseph Dolman. Newsday. 1/7/2004.
Now here we are again. Only this year, as the legislature yawns and stretches and does its best to look lifelike, Albany isn't simply weighing the components of yet another first-aid kit for the city's eternal budget emergencies. Not this time. Rather, the state is facing a court order to devise a funding system by July 30 that will allow city schools to give their students a quality education. As a poll-challenged pol who has asked New Yorkers to judge him on the basis of his education reforms, Bloomberg has a tremendous amount riding on what Albany's ultimately does.
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Joseph Dolman. Newsday. 7/2/2003.
For an army of embattled New York City public school boosters, the news last week was about as intoxicating as a washtub full of vintage Bordeaux. And no wonder. After years of uphill legal skirmishes and hopeless political fights, the advocates were suddenly and gloriously winners. Their tales of deprivation and injustice at the hands of a craven State Legislature were true, all true, State Court of Appeals Chief Judge Judith Kaye reckoned in a landmark decision. The court gave Albany's grandees 400 days to fix things.
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