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Thomas Cogan. Queens Gazette. 4/12/2006.
Nassau County Executive Thomas R. Suozzi is challenging the seemingly unstoppable Eliot Spitzer for this year's Democratic Party nomination to be governor of New York. As a way of admitting the difficulty of his task, he told his audience at the Queens Chamber of Commerce Installation Luncheon that Spitzer, the state's attorney general, is "a giant", while in contrast, "62 percent of the people don't even know me." To make himself better known, he is on a heavy speaking schedule between now and the date of the primary election, September 12. At the QCC luncheon in April, he was getting some attention in advance of Spitzer, who is to be the speaker at the QCC Business Expo and Luncheon, May 18 at Terrace on the Park.
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John Toscano. Queens Gazette. 4/5/2006.
Queens lawmakers in Albany serving in both houses and affiliated with both parties were solidly on board with their respective leaders in voting for the bipartisan budget fashioned by Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver and Senate Majority Leader Joseph Bruno.
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Robin Finn. New York Times. 3/31/2006.
Eight wild weeks into her job as executive director of the Campaign for Fiscal Equity, after her eighth trip to Albany to sweet-talk, or agitate, the Legislature on behalf of the cash-deprived New York City school system, the Hon. Geri D. Palast — as her business cards identify her — returned to her still undecorated Midtown office a satiated mover and shaker of public policy. Almost.
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Richard Gentilviso. Queens Gazette. 3/22/2006.
Rejecting a ride later this month with the city Department of Education (DOE), the first independent Parents' Lobby Day took place last week when busloads of public school parents joined forces with teachers in Albany.
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Joseph Spector. Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. 9/4/2005.
Carolee Albert is helping her six grandchildren get through the Rochester School District, so she's obviously interested in the district's fate. And while she's watching the race for mayor closely, she shrugs off suggestions that the next city leader can significantly affect the struggling school system.
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Stuart Low. Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. 1/23/2005.
Many schools' arts budgets are strained at a time when educators stress the importance of the arts for student development. And increasingly, youngsters no longer encounter the fine arts at home. These struggles are especially keen in some urban classrooms. The arts have become a microcosm of well-known inequities between city and suburban schools
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Greg Winter. New York Times. 5/8/2003.
At 52, Mr. Jackson is leading a 150-mile march from Manhattan to Albany to dramatize the lawsuit in which he is both plaintiff and progenitor. Contending that the state has shirked its own constitutional obligation to provide all children with a sound basic education, the suit challenges whether its $13 billion education budget for 3 million schoolchildren is nearly enough.
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Michael Rowett. Arkansas Democrat-Gazette . 1/15/2003.
A dozen years ago, Kentucky overhauled its public schools under court order and enacted reforms that have been touted as a national model. Yet, education problems persist, and many education leaders in the Bluegrass State worry that budget woes endanger the momentum.
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Editorials
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El Diario. 9/8/2005.
As our children head back to school today, Gov. George Pataki is still fighting orders from the courts, including the highest court in the state, directing him to pay the city its fair share of money for the education of our children.
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Jody Siegle. Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. 9/6/2005.
As students head back to school preoccupied with their friends, teachers and classes, they are probably oblivious to the huge debate over how best to educate them. A glance at the education headlines provides a list of the issues that school board members will be discussing this year.
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El Diario. 9/2/2005.
On Tuesday, Sept. 13, New York Democrats will have the opportunity to nominate for mayor someone who is not only their strongest candidate – the one with the widest support and the best chance to take back the mayoralty – but also who happens to be the most experienced and qualified Democrat to run this sprawling, tough-to-please, tougher-to-manage, multi-racial, multi-cultural city. That person is Fernando Ferrer.
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El Diario. 8/29/2005.
From Washington Heights to Wall Street, from East Harlem to Soho, Manhattan is packed with diverse neighborhoods and business districts. To lead Manhattan, the Borough President must be able to energize people and build coalitions across social, economic, ethnic and political lines. In the crowded field of candidates running for the Democratic nomination for Manhattan Borough President, we believe Adriano Espaillat stands out as the best person for the job.
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New York Daily News. 5/8/2005.
The courts have ordered Gov. Pataki and the state Legislature to increase school aid by $5.6 billion a year to remedy an unconstitutional failure to provide a "sound, basic education" to the city's children. Bloomberg and Chancellor Joel Klein have developed plans to spend the money to reduce class sizes and begin programs such as prekindergarten instruction. But putting the funds to optimal use will also require overhauling a 200-plus-page teachers contract that dictates, in minute detail, how the city schools operate.
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Michael Gormley. Newsday. 5/1/2005.
An appeals court is scheduled to make two rulings Tuesday that could force the state to come up with billions of dollars more in school aid for September and blow apart New York's first on-time budget in 20 years. CFE seeks to eliminate the temporary stay or delay of the court order to pay billions of dollars more in state school aid to New York City schools until the appeal is decided. The parent and teachers union group also seeks to force the appeal to be decided quicker, by the end of June instead of a year or more from now as would normally be the case.
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Michael A. Rebell. New York Times. 5/1/2005.
The doctrine of separation of powers came under heavy fire in the Terri Schiavo case, and while the judiciary was collectively able to repel the attack, an even more entrenched challenge to the integrity of the courts and the rule of law is now unfolding in a case in New York. It's not just our form of government that hangs in the balance; it's also the fate of more than one million schoolchildren in New York City and hundreds of thousands of others throughout the state.
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Andrew Wolf. New York Sun. 4/29/2005.
The state of New York is under court order to increase funding for the schools, a decision being appealed by Governor Pataki. Since the Campaign for Fiscal Equity court case was filed more than a decade ago, expenditures on the public schools have more than doubled. Since no one is happy with the results of this already dramatic increase, why should anyone believe that further increases would make a difference?
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Josh Greenman. New York Daily News. 4/26/2005.
We pay our professional athletes millions and consider championships our ultimate goal, but there's a vital victory we should strive for off the field as well. Here's how these privileged players can buy back some goodwill: invest 1% of their salaries every year in the city's most important and underpaid professionals, our schoolteachers.
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Editorial Staff. New York Post. 4/25/2005.
In the time that's elapsed since the Campaign for Fiscal Equity first filed its 1993 lawsuit to get more money for city schools, most of the students then in the system have graduated (or dropped out). So far, nobody's seen a dime in extra school aid. Yet there was the CFE last week, again using the courts to achieve what it might better have achieved in the political arena.
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Journalism by Region
Articles
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Susan Saulny. New York Times. 5/14/2006.
Randi Weingarten, the president of the New York City teachers' union, announced yesterday the start of an expansive campaign to build public support for smaller class sizes that will include advertising on television and the Internet, picketing outside schools and the celebrity endorsement of Frank McCourt, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author and former teacher.
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Yancey Roy. Journal News. 5/3/2006.
Democrat Tom Suozzi announced a plan yesterday that he said would cut property taxes by $2.15 billion, primarily downstate, in exchange for capping school spending.
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David McKay Wilson. Journal News. 5/2/2006.
With a massive infusion of state aid in hand, a citizens group suing New York over inadequate education funding for Yonkers today will ask Supreme Court Justice Joan Lefkowitz to dismiss its lawsuit against the state.
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Ronda Kaysen. Downtown Express. 4/28/2006.
Governor George Pataki signed legislation Monday providing capital funding for New York City schools, paving the way for the city to build two new elementary schools Downtown.
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Jeanine Ramirez. New York One News. 4/24/2006.
Local officials announced Monday that more than $11 billion in state and city funding will be used for school construction, expansion and repairs in all five boroughs.
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Molly McCarthy. Elmira Star-Gazette. 4/22/2006.
Members of the Steuben County chapter of League of Women Voters of New York State will meet today to discuss how public education is funded in the state.
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Advance Staff Report. Staten Island Advance. 4/21/2006.
The American Association of University Women will hold a forum on education at its monthly meeting Tuesday at 8 p.m. in the courthouse at Historic Richmond Town.
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Yoav Gonen. Staten Island Advance. 4/19/2006.
Contending the state budget fails to adequately redress a longstanding shortfall in funding for New York City schools, the advocacy group that originally sued to remedy the problem has filed an appeal with the state's highest court, seeking to force Albany lawmakers to comply with prior court rulings under threat of substantial penalties.
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Associated Press. New York Post. 4/19/2006.
Advocates who were promised billions of dollars in extra state funds for the city's public schools are asking the state's highest court to force Albany lawmakers to pay the full amount - or face fines and jail time.
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Elissa Gootman. New York Times. 4/19/2006.
Education advocates seeking more state aid for New York City public schools appealed to the state's highest court, the Court of Appeals, yesterday, asking it to force state lawmakers to allocate the extra money before the legislative session ends in June
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Columns
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Dick Iannuzzi. New York Teacher. 4/13/2006.
Two weeks ago, I wrote in this space about the effectiveness of cooperation. I cited a handful of examples from NYSUT locals and school districts across the state that demonstrated, quite often, that working together works. Well, since then, that working together concept has proven itself in several very significant ways. And that's good news for our profession and for the families of New York state.
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Mary Anna Towler. Rochester City Newspaper. 4/5/2006.
Well, city taxpayers, get ready to start celebrating. Forget about begging Albany for more money. The good people of the Town of Brighton, backed by the Brighton-Pittsford Post, have come up with a way to help solve the city's financial problems: Get tax-exempt properties to pay for the services they use.
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John Toscano. Queens Gazette. 4/5/2006.
Keep the champagne chilled for about another week and hold the toasts for the remarkable job our mayor did in getting the school construction funds he demanded from the state legislature.
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Tom Robbins. Village Voice. 8/16/2005.
Being a lame-duck governor deprives George Pataki of much of his Albany clout, but it does nothing to diminish his substantial powers of office. And before he takes off for the Iowa caucuses on his quixotic presidential quest, the Peekskill patroon is poised to make the most of it by rolling out scores of appointments.
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Nicole Gelinas. City Journal. 6/16/2005.
Student test scores rose in New York City this year—and in some classrooms and schools, kids made truly significant gains. Consider Region Five, a poor district of eastern Brooklyn and Queens. As Julia Levy reported in the New York Sun, the district was an “educational wasteland for decades,” with two-thirds of the schoolchildren failing at everything. But this year, the district’s elementary- and middle-school students pulled off testing gains of 17 percentage points in English and 10 percentage points in math, outpacing the city’s average gains in both areas.
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Judy Ducayne. The Citizen. 3/1/2005.
New York state taxpayers are being strong-armed by the education system once again. The newest "scam" says we need to produce more money to fund New York City schools. This would result in major income tax increases for middle-class families or a huge statewide sales tax increase. We're talking about a total increase in school spending amounting to $9.36 billion, according to the Campaign for Fiscal Equity. This would be put in place over the next four years in equal amounts of about $2.46 billion per year.
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Joseph Dolman. Newsday. 3/31/2004.
After many years of struggle in the schoolhouses of America's tough- luck central cities, we've learned this much: It's insanely hard to turn around troubled students who live in a world of chaos and failure.
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Joseph Dolman. Newsday. 1/22/2004.
It's still a favorite subject for an army of aging romantics perched on barstools throughout the five boroughs. Give them half a chance and they will launch into a seminar on New York City as Casablanca West.
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Utica Observer-Dispatch. 1/8/2004.
Will Gov. George Pataki make a comeback?
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Joseph Dolman. Newsday. 1/7/2004.
Now here we are again. Only this year, as the legislature yawns and stretches and does its best to look lifelike, Albany isn't simply weighing the components of yet another first-aid kit for the city's eternal budget emergencies. Not this time. Rather, the state is facing a court order to devise a funding system by July 30 that will allow city schools to give their students a quality education. As a poll-challenged pol who has asked New Yorkers to judge him on the basis of his education reforms, Bloomberg has a tremendous amount riding on what Albany's ultimately does.
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Letters to the Editor
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Bob Cohen. Albany Times Union. 4/11/2006.
Your editorial stating that the current state budget is a mixed bag at best for Albany schools was right on the mark ("Good news, bad news," April 4). Even with the Legislature's $5.4 million increase in state education aid, Albany residents once again face the prospect of budget cuts and a double-digit property tax increase.
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Peter Brothers. Albany Times Union. 4/2/2005.
Your recent editorial "The bill comes due," regarding the school aid lawsuit, hits home with a lot of us. I could not have said it better than when you mention "But they didn't do their jobs, they talked and dithered, argued and postured. ... But no action," referring to Gov. George Pataki, Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver and Senate Majority Leader Joseph Bruno.
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Vito Sciscioli (Sirector, Syracus 20/20). The Post-Standard. 1/24/2005.
On behalf of Syracuse 20/20, I am writing relative to your Dec. 20 editorial, "Court Gesture" and other articles recently reporting on school finance reform in New York State. Syracuse 20/20 certainly agrees that the citizens of this state face an historic opportunity to demand statewide reform of New York's education funding system that provides all students with a sound basic education. However, we would argue that the solution must be through state legislation enacted during the 2005 Legislative Session and not through the courts.
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Bernadette Medige. Buffalo News. 1/18/2005.
A recent News editorial chided Buffalo Board of Education Member Catherine Collins for marching to her own drummer by opposing charter schools despite parent demand for them, and for wanting to delay the closing of three elementary schools. Smaller classes and better programming are not demands unique to charter school parents. Parents, the Board of Education and the unions are all in agreement on this. The Campaign for Fiscal Equity is fighting -- and winning -- to make funding them a reality for all children statewide.
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Stephen Morello (Director of Communications, New York City Department of Education. ). New York Times. 12/20/2004.
Re ''How to Spend $5.6 Billion? Heed Those in the Classrooms,'' by Samuel G. Freedman (On Education column, Dec. 15): Mr. Freedman implies that through some sort of disconnect, the city's plan under the Campaign for Fiscal Equity lawsuit, a case that moved toward resolution last month with the recommendation by a court-appointed panel to increase aid to city schools by $5.6 billion a year, did not contain funds for improvements proposed by the staff of Middle School 45.
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Richard Lindsay. The Post-Standard. 8/10/2004.
Your July 30 editorial, "Another Failure," was a deliberately disingenuous presentation of our education financial situation. The editor seems to ignore the real goal here, which is providing all children in New York state with a sound education, without bankrupting the state's taxpayers in order to do so.
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Calvin Corriders (President, Syracuse Board of Education) & Cynthia Kirby (Vice President, Syracuse Board of Education). The Post-Standard. 5/3/2004.
The Syracuse City School District educates a student population that contains many more students of poverty, students with disabilities and students with limited English proficiency than the surrounding districts. All of these students require more resources in order to succeed. In addition, our infrastructure is very old, most of the buildings being between 70 and 100 years old. This requires more resources to upgrade and maintain our school buildings.
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Bonnie Brower. Newsday. 4/29/2004.
Forget about baseball, folks. The hottest game in town between now and early summer is the city's budget. It's a bloodsport of dueling tax-cut proposals by Mayor Michael Bloomberg and City Council Speaker Gifford Miller.
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Michael A. Rebell. Albany Times Union. 3/13/2004.
The March 2 article, "School aid plan targets taxpayers," misrepresents two important elements of the Campaign for Fiscal Equity's recently proposed education reform plan for operating aid.
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Michael A. Rebell. Newsday. 6/28/2002.
Although Gov. George Pataki has called the state's education-funding formula "a dinosaur," this week he has shown that the standards he supports for our children are downright prehistoric. The governor said he was "pleased" with an appeals court decision that called a high school education "aspirational" and derisively ruled that the state has no obligation to prepare our students for anything more than menial minimum-wage jobs.
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