Alliance For Quality Education. 02/2001.

Upstate, Downstate: How Southern Tier Schools Will Benefit from School Funding Reform

Introduction

The landmark State Supreme Court decision issued on January 10, 2001 could have an enormous positive impact on the quality of education for children across New York State. In his decision in Campaign for Fiscal Equity v. State of New York, Judge Leland DeGrasse affirmed the constitutional right of every child in New York State to receive a sound basic education, and ordered the New York State Legislature to establish a new state education funding formula by September 2001. The new formula must provide enough resources to every school to give every child in New York State a sound basic education. The Alliance for Quality Education is issuing this report to illustrate the beneficial impact the court decision could have on school children in the Southern Tier. This is the first in a series of reports AQE will release on the impact of the CFE decision on schools throughout the state.

This report uses the school aid formula proposed by the Midstate School Finance Consortium as an example of what the legislature could do to implement the CFE court decision. The Midstate School Finance Consortium is comprised of more than 200 school districts in 27 upstate New York counties. Midstate has developed an approach to revising the funding formula that closely addresses the requirements of the lawsuit and the judge's decision. The Midstate proposal allows us to analyze how implementation of the court decision might effect school funding in the Southern Tier. Under Midstate's formula, 84% of Southern Tier school districts would receive more state school aid.

The Alliance for Quality Education ("AQE") is a new coalition of over one hundred organizations dedicated to a quality education for children, with collectively hundreds of thousands of members throughout the state. AQE is not endorsing the Midstate formula, or any specific formula. Until the Legislature completes the "costing out" of a sound basic education as required by the Judge's decision, we will not know what level of per pupil spending is necessary. Once the cost of a sound basic education is established, AQE is open to considering a variety of approaches to creating a new formula. Meanwhile, AQE views the Midstate proposal as a step in the right direction, and an excellent example of the type of formula that would meet the requirements of the court decision. The proposal is used in this report to illustrate that a formula that addresses the court decision will have to provide increased state aid to most districts across the state, not just New York City.

Background: The Campaign for Fiscal Equity Court Decision [T]he present funding system does not deliver resources adequate to meet students' needs because it is not set up to do this; the system has no mechanism at all to assess need. Despite being a complex collection of nearly 50 disparate formula and grants purporting to relate to spending, the system no longer distributes education aid on any rational basis. Instead, it serves primarily to support a long-standing political deal that each year allocates to New York City and other parts of the state a set percentage of any increase in state education aid, no matter the actual needs or cost of educating students. Campaign for Fiscal Equity Statement.

On January 10th, 2001, Judge Leland DeGrasse shook up the education world in New York State by ruling that the state's system of financing education was illegal. Judge DeGrasse ordered the State Legislature to restructure the state education financing system by September 15th, and directed the parties to report their progress in achieving this goal by June 15th. Ruling in a lawsuit known as Campaign for Fiscal Equity v. State of New York (the "CFE decision"), the judge held that the education funding system in the state violated the "Education Article" of the New York State Constitution, which requires the state to provide all children with a "sound basic education", as well as federal regulations prohibiting racial discrimination in programs funded by the federal government, including schools.

The Judge was responding to voluminous evidence presented in the case that schoolchildren in New York City were not receiving a "sound basic education," a term that he defined to "consist of the foundational skills that students need to become productive citizens capable of civic engagement and sustaining competitive employment." The Judge found that City schools did not provide for many critical educational needs of children, making it difficult if not possible for children to learn. He established seven key characteristics of a sound basic education, and required that the state provide the resources to provide them :

1.

Sufficient numbers of qualified teachers, principals and other personnel.

2.

Appropriate class sizes.

3.

Adequate and accessible school buildings with sufficient space to ensure appropriate class size and implementation of a sound curriculum.

4.

Sufficient and up to date books, supplies, libraries, educational technology and laboratories.

5.

Suitable curricula, including an expanded platform of programs to help at risk students by giving them "more time on task."

6.

Adequate resources for students with extraordinary needs.

7.

A safe orderly environment.

The Alliance for Quality Education believes that it is critical to examine the impact of this decision for all of the state's children. We are particularly concerned about inaccurate media reports suggesting that the decision, resulting from a lawsuit brought by students, parents and organizations from New York City, would only benefit that community. As this report demonstrates, nothing could be further from the truth. As Judge DeGrasse himself stated in his opinion: "[While] this action has focused principally on how the current system affects New York City... any remedy will necessarily involve the entire state."

Given that children in communities throughout the state face the same problems (unqualified teachers, inadequate buildings, school overcrowding, and out-of-date textbooks) documented for New York City through the CFE litigation, the legislature needs to increase funding to districts across the state to meet the constitutional requirement of providing every child with a sound basic education.

The backdrop of this report is Judge DeGrasse's order that the Legislature determine the actual costs of providing a sound basic education in districts around the State, as a first step in reform of the education funding system. AQE believes that the data in this report illustrates convincingly that once the true costs are determined in a rational way, the overwhelming majority of schoolchildren from throughout the state will benefit from the CFE decision.

Midstate School Finance Consortium School Aid Proposal

In order to determine the impact of the CFE decision throughout the state, AQE used the data contained in a proposal developed by the Midstate School Finance Consortium, a coalition of 272 school districts in 27 upstate New York counties with an above average proportion of rural and poor communities (the "Midstate Proposal"). Midstate members share the concerns of the Alliance for Quality Education that poorer upstate rural school districts often have not received their fair share of school aid increases. In response, Midstate developed a simple school aid formula to achieve the goals of "fairness for all children, equity for all taxpayers, and a school aid formula with predictability." We do not yet know how the Legislature will choose to change the current formula, but the Midstate Proposal provides one approach. Their model formula allows us to determine the impact across the state of a formula that provides each district with a minimum level of per pupil spending.

The Midstate Proposal would replace the present 70-page inequitable and chaotic school aid "formula" with a simplified new method of determining school aid that provides for greater equity between wealthy and poor districts, and places a greater emphasis on the true costs of educating children in each district. In summary, the Midstate Proposal calculates aid for each district by:

applying a "sound basic education" funding level of $8,176 for each pupil in the district, adjusted to reflect local costs;

calculating "extraordinary needs aid" to reflect the higher cost of educating students who come from families of below-average wealth, have limited English language skills and/or are living in sparsely populated areas;

promoting tax fairness by a formula that ensures that communities throughout the state make an equal minimum tax contribution to their local schools; and

protecting districts from being penalized by the new aid formula by a guarantee that no district will receive less aid under the new formula than under present law.

Moreover, Midstate meets many of the essential mandates of the CFE decision concerning the methodology to be used in determining the new school aid formula including: ensuring that every school district has the resources necessary for providing the opportunity for a sound basic education, and taking into account variations in local costs. It is thus a useful model for the Legislature to begin with in its efforts, mandated by the CFE decision, to examine the present school aid formula, and a useful gauge of whether mandated changes in the school aid formula will only aid one region of the state.

Findings

A new, fair formula, that provides enough resources to provide a sound basic education to every child in New York State would be particularly helpful for children in the Southern Tier. Under the Midstate Proposal, Southern Tier schools would see the following benefits:

In the eight Southern Tier Counties , four out of five school districts (84% of all Southern Tier districts) would receive increased state aid under the Midstate Proposal; that's 47 out of 56 districts. 16% of the Southern Tier districts would stay at their current level of funding; that's 9 out of 56 districts.

In every Southern Tier County the majority of districts would receive increased state aid. In three Southern Tier counties, (Chemung, Tioga and Tompkins), every school district in the county would receive an increase. See charts 1 and 2.

The amount of state school aid to all eight counties combined would increase 19%, providing an additional $130 million annually to area children and the regional economy. See chart 3.

The Binghamton City school district would receive a 50% increase in state aid, representing a $15.4 million increase. See charts 4 and 5.

Broome County school districts would receive a 35% increase in state aid overall; a $60.3 million increase.

Tioga County school districts would receive a 27% increase in state aid overall; a $16.7 million increase.

Four other Southern Tier counties (Chemung, Chenango, Steuben, Tompkins) would receive percentage increases in state school aid in the double digits.

No one can predict with certainty the final economic impact of the Campaign for Fiscal Equity decision on any single school district, because there are numerous factors that the Legislature may take into account in determining any new school aid formula. However, the Midstate Proposal illustrates that if every child is provided with a "sound basic education" in accordance with the requirements of the New York State Constitution, children throughout New York State will benefit.

Conclusion and Recommendations

This brief summary of the Midstate Proposal, its relationship to the CFE decision and the impact on the Southern Tier schools, illustrates that meaningful school reform does not require that we pit children or taxpayers from different regions against each other. Everyone in the state has an interest in revising the outmoded and inequitable school aid formula. It is essential that the Legislature enact real reform in the 2001 session rather than cosmetic changes. Every delay by the State delays the funding our schools need to provide every child with the quality education they deserve.

In this regard, we note that the Governor's "Flex-Aid" proposal, and proposed increase in school aid of $382 million of a $14.1 billion budget does not correct the fundamental problem of educational inadequacies. "Flex-Aid" enables school districts to use existing funding more flexibly, however, "Flex-Aid" does not address the fundamental issue of adequate funding identified by the CFE decision. Further, $382 million is far too little to meet even the immediate needs of our schools: if we did no more than implement existing formulas and previously mandated increases, there would be a $1.5 billion increase in this year's state school budget. Now is the time to increase investment in education, not move backwards.

The Governor and the Legislature must act now to meet the deadlines in the CFE decision. The responsible course is not to wait and cynically hope that the decision will be overturned on appeal, but to do the right thing this session and rectify the problems with the state education formula, as mandated by the Court. As a first step towards this goal, we recommend that both houses of the Legislature take immediate steps to determine the cost of providing a sound basic education, and to develop alternate approaches to the formula. Appointment of an expert panel, as recommended by the Campaign for Fiscal Equity, is a positive way to move forward. Rapid implementation of the CFE decision is the best way to provide every child with the quality education they deserve.

The Alliance for Quality Education also believes that the Legislature must take certain steps this session, irrespective of its approach to the CFE decision. All of our proposals involve matters where the educational need is not subject to dispute, where the positive educational outcomes that will result are demonstrable, and where the Legislature itself has previously agreed that increased funding is necessary: smaller class sizes, teacher training, adequate buildings, and early childhood programs. AQE therefore advocates these legislative changes this session, in addition to immediate implementation of the CFE decision:

full funding of the class size and universal pre-kindergarten initiatives in the LADDER (Learning, Achieving and Developing by Directing Education Resources) program at the appropriation levels agreed to in the 1997 State Budget Accord;

significant increases in funding for teacher training and development to help prepare teachers across the state to teach to the new standards; and

authorizing the State Dormitory Authority to do borrowing on behalf of individual school districts, to address the debt limit problem faced by the "Big 5" school districts, and the high transaction costs of small borrowings for smaller districts.

Now is the time to fundamentally reform education in New York State. New York State cannot afford to let this generation of children grow up without the level of education necessary to achieve competitive employment and a decent quality of life. Simply put, our children can't wait for a quality education.

Charts: (County Summaries)

CHART 1:  COUNTY SUMMARY

 

 

CURRENT*

MIDSTATE'S

INCREASE IN

PERCENT

Total #

# of Districts

% of Districts

COUNTY

STATE AID

TOTAL AID

STATE AID

INCREASE

School

With Increase

With Increase

 

 

(with save harmless)

with Midstate

IN STATE AID

Districts

in State Aid

in State Aid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BROOME

$171,059,342

$231,345,874

$60,286,532

35%

12

11

92%

CHEMUNG

$85,892,047

$98,463,844

$12,571,797

15%

3

3

100%

CHENANGO

$76,905,921

$87,662,826

$10,756,905

14%

8

7

88%

CORTLAND

$54,474,185

$59,576,197

$5,102,012

9%

5

4

80%

SCHUYLER

$17,324,463

$18,024,348

$699,885

4%

2

1

50%

STEUBEN

$139,929,512

$155,240,631

$15,311,119

11%

14

9

64%

TIOGA

$62,264,717

$78,975,067

$16,710,350

27%

6

6

100%

TOMPKINS

$63,477,939

$71,946,341

$8,468,402

13%

6

6

100%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

$671,328,126

$801,235,127

$129,907,001

19%

56

47

84%

 

*without small cities and rescue aid

 

 

 

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CHART 4: SOUTHERN TIER SCHOOL DISTRICTS

 

 

 

CURRENT*

MIDSTATE'S

 

INCREASE IN

PERCENT

County

District Name

STATE AID

TOTAL AID

 

STATE AID

INCREASE

 

 

 

(with save harmless)

STATE AID

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BROOME

CHENANGO FORKS

$15,093,773

$18,909,918

 

$3,816,145

25%

 

BINGHAMTON    

$30,953,931

$46,373,897

 

$15,419,966

50%

 

HARPURSVILLE  

$8,683,513

$11,152,626

 

$2,469,113

28%

 

SUSQUEHANNA VA

$16,336,730

$19,670,947

 

$3,334,217

20%

 

CHENANGO VALLE

$9,500,176

$12,229,918

 

$2,729,742

29%

 

MAINE ENDWELL

$12,936,381

$17,677,543

 

$4,741,162

37%

 

DEPOSIT       

$4,654,705

$4,654,705

 

$0

0%

 

WHITNEY POINT

$14,758,281

$19,835,840

 

$5,077,559

34%

 

UNION-ENDICOTT

$19,880,847

$26,614,013

 

$6,733,166

34%

 

JOHNSON   CITY

$11,629,488

$15,181,050

 

$3,551,562

31%

 

VESTAL        

$14,395,246

$23,044,479

 

$8,649,233

60%

 

WINDSOR       

$12,236,271

$16,000,937

 

$3,764,666

31%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHEMUNG

ELMIRA        

$53,827,499

$63,268,982

 

$9,441,483

18%

 

HORSEHEADS    

$24,781,129

$26,895,375

 

$2,114,246

9%

 

ELMIRA HEIGHTS

$7,283,419

$8,299,487

 

$1,016,068

14%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHENANGO

AFTON         

$5,494,561

$6,762,353

 

$1,267,792

23%

 

BAINBRIDGE GUI

$7,170,281

$8,099,057

 

$928,776

13%

 

GREENE        

$10,005,222

$12,013,842

 

$2,008,620

20%

 

UNADILLA      

$12,667,686

$12,667,686

 

$0

0%

 

NORWICH       

$14,018,279

$16,955,596

 

$2,937,317

21%

 

GRGETWN-SO OTS

$5,032,567

$5,170,936

 

$138,369

3%

 

OXFORD        

$7,463,684

$8,191,118

 

$727,434

10%

 

SHERBURNE EARL

$15,053,641

$17,802,238

 

$2,748,597

18%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CORTLAND

CINCINNATUS   

$6,656,832

$6,656,832

 

$0

0%

 

CORTLAND      

$18,408,954

$19,573,265

 

$1,164,311

6%

 

MCGRAW        

$6,712,608

$6,794,375

 

$81,767

1%

 

HOMER         

$14,694,175

$17,055,057

 

$2,360,882

16%

 

MARATHON      

$8,001,616

$9,496,667

 

$1,495,051

19%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SCHUYLER

ODESSA MONTOUR

$6,914,648

$7,614,533

 

$699,885

10%

 

WATKINS GLEN  

$10,409,815

$10,409,815

 

$0

0%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STEUBEN

ADDISON       

$9,878,641

$11,139,927

 

$1,261,286

13%

 

AVOCA         

$7,224,565

$7,867,661

 

$643,096

9%

 

BATH          

$14,340,780

$16,931,123

 

$2,590,343

18%

 

BRADFORD      

$2,472,827

$2,472,827

 

$0

0%

 

CAMPBELL-SAVON

$14,118,467

$14,118,467

 

$0

0%

 

CANISTEO      

$7,534,873

$7,839,878

 

$305,005

4%

 

CORNING       

$28,179,448

$33,772,511

 

$5,593,063

20%

 

GREENWOOD     

$2,442,303

$2,442,303

 

$0

0%

 

HORNELL       

$13,518,066

$16,354,797

 

$2,836,731

21%

 

ARKPORT       

$6,132,939

$7,010,481

 

$877,542

14%

 

PRATTSBURG    

$3,919,512

$4,638,527

 

$719,015

18%

 

JASPER-TRPSBRG

$5,247,388

$5,732,426

 

$485,038

9%

 

HAMMONDSPORT  

$6,056,607

$6,056,607

 

$0

0%

 

WAYLAND-COHOCT

$18,863,096

$18,863,096

 

$0

0%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TIOGA

WAVERLY       

$12,591,008

$15,770,500

 

$3,179,492

25%

 

CANDOR        

$6,803,782

$8,551,268

 

$1,747,486

26%

 

NEWARK VALLEY

$10,044,823

$12,872,800

 

$2,827,977

28%

 

OWEGO-APALACHIAN

$15,248,516

$18,867,146

 

$3,618,630

24%

 

SPENCER VAN ET

$7,918,792

$9,974,984

 

$2,056,192

26%

 

TIOGA         

$9,657,796

$12,938,368

 

$3,280,572

34%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOMPKINS

DRYDEN        

$12,728,660

$14,425,813

 

$1,697,153

13%

 

GROTON        

$9,348,478

$11,370,880

 

$2,022,402

22%

 

ITHACA        

$19,006,126

$20,386,005

 

$1,379,879

7%

 

LANSING       

$5,834,214

$6,142,773

 

$308,559

5%

 

NEWFIELD      

$6,633,565

$8,192,808

 

$1,559,243

24%

 

TRUMANSBURG   

$9,926,896

$11,428,062

 

$1,501,166

15%

 

  *(without Small Cities Aid and Rescue Aid)

 

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APPENDIX A:  MIDSTATE CALCULATIONS FOR BROOME COUNTY

 

Calculate Operating and Extra. Needs Aid Under Midstate Proposal (With 2001 data)

 

District Name

CHENANGO FORKS

BINGHAMTON    

HARPURSVILLE  

SUSQUEHANNA VA

District Code

030101

030200

030501

030601

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 1: Calculate your Basic Operating Aid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foundation

$8,176

$8,176

$8,176

$8,176

NCES Cost Index

0.92

0.94

0.91

0.92

Adjusted Foundation Amount

$7,522

$7,660

$7,445

$7,534

  (Multiply Foundation by NCES Cost Index)

 

 

 

 

Number of pupils

2075

6036

1219

2221

(1) Subtotal

$15,607,329

$46,230,291

$9,075,608

$16,733,689

  (Mulitiply Adjusted Foundation by Pupils)

 

 

 

 

Full Value of Property (1997)

$270,777,096

$1,068,065,224

$149,109,148

$345,734,883

Local Effort Rate (divided by 1000)

0.013

0.013

0.013

0.013

(2) Required local effort

$3,520,102

$13,884,848

$1,938,419

$4,494,553

   (Full value x local effort rate)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL A: Basic Operating Aid [(1) - (2)]

$12,087,227

$32,345,443

$7,137,189

$12,239,136

 Operating Aid per Pupil

$5,825

$5,359

$5,855

$5,511

 

 

 

 

 

Step 2: Calculate your Extraordinary Needs Aid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of "At Risk" Pupils in Your District

836

4875

883

686

  (Extraordinary Needs Pupil Count)

 

 

 

 

CWR

0.52

0.596

0.393

0.571

(3) Calculate Adjusted EN Count

1608

8180

2247

1201

  (Divide "At Risk" pupils by CWR)

 

 

 

 

(4) Per Pupil Extraordinary Needs Aid

$843

$843

$843

$843

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL B: Extraordinary Needs Aid [(3) - (4)]

$1,355,285

$6,895,344

$1,894,069

$1,012,781

 Extraordinary Needs Aid per Pupil

$653

$1,142

$1,554

$456

 

 

 

 

 

Step 3: Add in your current total aid amounts for:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Building Aid

$3,017,065

$2,648,419

$741,446

$4,147,169

Transportation Aid

$1,228,052

$1,616,358

$756,027

$1,049,504

BOCES Aid

$1,208,648

$2,670,246

$532,791

$1,140,578

High-Cost Special Education Aid

$13,641

$198,087

$91,104

$81,779

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL C: Other Formula Aid

$5,467,406

$7,133,110

$2,121,368

$6,419,030

 

 

 

 

 

YOUR TOTAL STATE AID (A+B+C)

$18,909,918

$46,373,897

$11,152,626

$19,670,947

  TOTAL AID PER PUPIL

$9,113.21

$7,683.52

$9,149.00

$8,856.80

 

 

 

 

 

Present Total State Formula Aid

$15,093,773

$30,953,931

$8,683,513

$16,336,730

  (without Small Cities Aid and Rescue Aid)

 

 

 

 

  Present Aid per Pupil

$7,274

$5,129

$7,123

$7,356

 

 

 

 

 

Difference (Midstate Aid - Present Aid)

$3,816,145

$15,419,966

$2,469,113

$3,334,217

  Difference in Aid per Pupil

$1,839

$2,555

$2,026

$1,501

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL AID WITH SAVE HARMLESS

$18,909,918

$46,373,897

$11,152,626

$19,670,947

  TOTAL AID PER PUPIL

$9,113

$7,684

$9,149

$8,857

 

 

 

 

 

Difference (Midstate Aid with SH - Present Aid)

$3,816,145

$15,419,966

$2,469,113

$3,334,217

  Difference in Aid per Pupil

$1,839

$2,555

$2,026

$1,501

District Name

CHENANGO VALLE

MAINE ENDWELL

DEPOSIT       

WHITNEY POINT

District Code

030701

031101

031301

031401

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 1: Calculate your Basic Operating Aid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foundation

$8,176

$8,176

$8,176

$8,176

NCES Cost Index

0.92

0.92

0.90

0.92

Adjusted Foundation Amount

$7,507

$7,549

$7,382

$7,518

  (Multiply Foundation by NCES Cost Index)

 

 

 

 

Number of pupils

1950

2474

722

2156

(1) Subtotal

$14,635,508

$18,672,656

$5,326,027

$16,210,891

  (Mulitiply Adjusted Foundation by Pupils)

 

 

 

 

Full Value of Property (1997)

$398,819,695

$449,235,569

$296,572,576

$224,671,481

Local Effort Rate (divided by 1000)

0.013

0.013

0.013

0.013

(2) Required local effort

$5,184,656

$5,840,062

$3,855,443

$2,920,729

   (Full value x local effort rate)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL A: Basic Operating Aid [(1) - (2)]

$9,450,852

$12,832,594

$1,470,584

$13,290,162

 Operating Aid per Pupil

$4,848

$5,188

$2,038

$6,163

 

 

 

 

 

Step 2: Calculate your Extraordinary Needs Aid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of "At Risk" Pupils in Your District

665

790

567

1344

  (Extraordinary Needs Pupil Count)

 

 

 

 

CWR

0.781

0.743

0.896

0.371

(3) Calculate Adjusted EN Count

851

1063

633

3623

  (Divide "At Risk" pupils by CWR)

 

 

 

 

(4) Per Pupil Extraordinary Needs Aid

$843

$843

$843

$843

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL B: Extraordinary Needs Aid [(3) - (4)]

$717,791

$896,326

$533,461

$3,053,887

 Extraordinary Needs Aid per Pupil

$368

$362

$739

$1,416

 

 

 

 

 

Step 3: Add in your current total aid amounts for:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Building Aid

$631,787

$1,488,096

$829,252

$1,134,996

Transportation Aid

$717,330

$1,176,283

$273,227

$911,249

BOCES Aid

$635,980

$1,156,157

$333,306

$1,273,355

High-Cost Special Education Aid

$76,177

$128,088

$0

$172,192

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL C: Other Formula Aid

$2,061,274

$3,948,624

$1,435,785

$3,491,792

 

 

 

 

 

YOUR TOTAL STATE AID (A+B+C)

$12,229,918

$17,677,543

$3,439,830

$19,835,840

  TOTAL AID PER PUPIL

$6,273.36

$7,146.77

$4,767.61

$9,198.59

 

 

 

 

 

Present Total State Formula Aid

$9,500,176

$12,936,381

$4,654,705

$14,758,281

  (without Small Cities Aid and Rescue Aid)

 

 

 

 

  Present Aid per Pupil

$4,873

$5,230

$6,451

$6,844

 

 

 

 

 

Difference (Midstate Aid - Present Aid)

$2,729,742

$4,741,162

-$1,214,875

$5,077,559

  Difference in Aid per Pupil

$1,400

$1,917

-$1,684

$2,355

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL AID WITH SAVE HARMLESS

$12,229,918

$17,677,543

$4,654,705

$19,835,840

  TOTAL AID PER PUPIL

$6,273

$7,147

$6,451

$9,199

 

 

 

 

 

Difference (Midstate Aid with SH - Present Aid)

$2,729,742

$4,741,162

$0

$5,077,559

  Difference in Aid per Pupil

$1,400

$1,917

$0

$2,355

District Name

UNION-ENDICOTT

JOHNSON   CITY

VESTAL        

WINDSOR       

District Code

031501

031502

031601

031701

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 1: Calculate your Basic Operating Aid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foundation

$8,176

$8,176

$8,176

$8,176

NCES Cost Index

0.93

0.93

0.93

0.92

Adjusted Foundation Amount

$7,616

$7,589

$7,598

$7,517

  (Multiply Foundation by NCES Cost Index)

 

 

 

 

Number of pupils

4356

2567

4150

2077

(1) Subtotal

$33,169,867

$19,478,348

$31,532,783

$15,608,601

  (Mulitiply Adjusted Foundation by Pupils)

 

 

 

 

Full Value of Property (1997)

$987,654,629

$617,482,662

$1,017,534,274

$356,242,355

Local Effort Rate (divided by 1000)

0.013

0.013

0.013

0.013

(2) Required local effort

$12,839,510

$8,027,275

$13,227,946

$4,631,151

   (Full value x local effort rate)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL A: Basic Operating Aid [(1) - (2)]

$20,330,356

$11,451,073

$18,304,837

$10,977,451

 Operating Aid per Pupil

$4,668

$4,462

$4,411

$5,287

 

 

 

 

 

Step 2: Calculate your Extraordinary Needs Aid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of "At Risk" Pupils in Your District

1650

1435

593

961

  (Extraordinary Needs Pupil Count)

 

 

 

 

CWR

0.784

0.726

1.006

0.548

(3) Calculate Adjusted EN Count

2105

1977

589

1754

  (Divide "At Risk" pupils by CWR)

 

 

 

 

(4) Per Pupil Extraordinary Needs Aid

$843

$843

$843

$843

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL B: Extraordinary Needs Aid [(3) - (4)]

$1,774,171

$1,666,260

$496,917

$1,478,327

 Extraordinary Needs Aid per Pupil

$407

$649

$120

$712

 

 

 

 

 

Step 3: Add in your current total aid amounts for:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Building Aid

$1,235,235

$348,866

$807,507

$1,494,807

Transportation Aid

$988,209

$825,553

$1,537,203

$1,270,246

BOCES Aid

$2,286,042

$773,769

$1,885,938

$641,933

High-Cost Special Education Aid

$0

$115,529

$12,076

$138,174

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL C: Other Formula Aid

$4,509,486

$2,063,717

$4,242,724

$3,545,160

 

 

 

 

 

YOUR TOTAL STATE AID (A+B+C)

$26,614,013

$15,181,050

$23,044,479

$16,000,937

  TOTAL AID PER PUPIL

$6,110.44

$5,915.08

$5,552.89

$7,705.72

 

 

 

 

 

Present Total State Formula Aid

$19,880,847

$11,629,488

$14,395,246

$12,236,271

  (without Small Cities Aid and Rescue Aid)

 

 

 

 

  Present Aid per Pupil

$4,565

$4,531

$3,469

$5,893

 

 

 

 

 

Difference (Midstate Aid - Present Aid)

$6,733,166

$3,551,562

$8,649,233

$3,764,666

  Difference in Aid per Pupil

$1,546

$1,384

$2,084

$1,813

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL AID WITH SAVE HARMLESS

$26,614,013

$15,181,050

$23,044,479

$16,000,937

  TOTAL AID PER PUPIL

$6,110

$5,915

$5,553

$7,706

 

 

 

 

 

Difference (Midstate Aid with SH - Present Aid)

$6,733,166

$3,551,562

$8,649,233

$3,764,666

  Difference in Aid per Pupil

$1,546

$1,384

$2,084

$1,813

APPENDIX B:

 

How the Midstate Proposal Compares with the CFE Decision

 

In the recent Campaign for Fiscal Equity Decision, Judge Leland DeGrasse declared the State’s school aid formula

unconstitutional and ordered the State to:

The Midstate School Finance Consortium Proposal:

 

 

1.

1.      Ensure that every school district has the resources necessary for providing the opportunity for a sound basic education.

 

 

1.

1.      Ensures every school district has the necessary resources by providing the same starting point ($8176) for every child, regardless of where they live.  This would raise the floor significantly for many students in the state.  Extraordinary Needs Aid would provide additional aid for districts with low wealth and high numbers of “at risk” students.

 

 

1.

2.      Take into account variations in local costs.

 

 

1.

2.      Midstate employs the “Chambers Index”, created for the National Center for Education Statistics, to recognize local district cost differences.

 

 

1.

3.      Provide sustained and stable funding in order to promote long-term planning by schools and school districts.

 

 

1.

3.      The Midstate plan would provide stable funding through a true mathematical formula; there would be no need for annual manipulation by the legislature.

 

 

1.

4.      Provide as much transparency as possible so that the public may understand how the State distributes school aid.

 

 

1.

4.      Midstate’s simple proposal is easily explained and understood.

 

 

1.

5.      Ensure a system of accountability to measure whether the reforms implemented by the legislature actually provide the opportunity for a sound basic education and remedy the disparate impact of the current finance system.

 

 

1.

5.      Midstate did not address accountability in its funding proposal, but fully agrees with the need to do so.